Monthly Archives: November 2014

The Great Big Cyclothymia Q&A

This Q&A is almost entirely composed of search terms which have brought people to my blog.  I’m no expert, but over the years I like to think I’ve collected some instructive experiences and learnt, often from my mistakes, a few things which may, if not help others, then at least provide them with a perspective to consider as they continue researching these things.

How do you deal with a colleague who has cyclothymia?

I recommend dealing with a colleague who has cyclothymia in exactly the same way you deal with a colleague with curly hair.

If you would like to help a colleague who has cyclothymia then your first stop should be having a conversation with them about what they might need in the work place – it could be a friendly face, a regular coffee break or lunch-date with a colleague, it could be additional meetings with line managers to help flag up feelings of being overwhelmed or excessively stressed before they turn into massive problems.

If you have cyclothymia and you’re thinking about how to deal with this at work I recommend looking at the Mind website. They have extensive advice on being mentally healthy at work and the possible risks and benefits of ‘coming out’ at work about your mental health issues.  I personally have never disclosed a mental health problem to an employer, with mixed results.  The most negative experience was when I was a manager and my staff told me “you’re funny because you’re great to be around sometimes because you’re so enthusiastic and positive but sometimes you’re incredibly grumpy and it’s no fun working here then” which came as something of a surprise as I thought I was hiding my mood swings well.  If you’re considering disclosing your mental health status to an employer or colleagues remember that they probably already know something about you is cognitively….off.

Can you hold a job with cyclothymia?

This really isn’t a question with a definitive answer.  It depends on you, how well you are able to manage your moods, how you respond to stress, how much stress your job entails….Personally. I’ve found jobs which have a degree of flexibility – for example office work which has varied tasks to be completed in a month ranging from mindless data entry to complex accountancy work – to be one of the better positions I’ve held as I was able to set my own schedule for the day or week, and work around my capacity for concentration and originality at any given time.  Conversely, working in customer service, whilst tremendously easy when hypomanic, was excruciating and often-times disastrous when I was depressed.

Holding a job with cyclothymia, like any other mental health issue, is a question of how well you manage your symptoms, what degree of flexibility you need and can have, and how much you disclose to an employer and their response.

Is cyclothymia an excuse/reason for being rude?

It’s not an excuse, but it can often be a reason.

Both highs and lows bring their challenges for social interaction.  I talk over people when hypomanic and am curt with people when I am depressed.  I work hard to remind myself to think first and act and speak second.  But impulse control, as you likely know if you are reading this, can be a huge challenge when at the extremes of mood.

I always maintain that no matter what my mood, I am accountable for my actions – I apologise to friends and family I think I may have offended or upset as soon as I am able, and I try and let close friends know where my mood is so they can be prepared for some irrationality.  How well your friends tolerate your moods is down to a lot of factors – their patience and understanding, your willingness to be accountable for your actions, and sometimes, just dumb luck.

Should I tell my friends I have cyclothymia?

My close friends know, acquaintances and colleagues don’t.  As I say in the above point, having your friends understand why you may act erratically or very differently from one week to the next can help you maintain better relationships. Friends can also offer support and understanding when you really need it.

In the end, it’s up to you – what do you want to get out telling your friends? Do you want to help them understand you better? Do you want to ask them for support in some areas of your life? Do you want them to know that you understand their struggles with mental health because you have your own? All good reasons to share. If you want to tell your friends in order to get a carte blanche to treat them differently or to demand they alter their behaviour around you then you may want to think more deeply about how you relate to these people and what is reasonable, or unreasonable, to ask of people.

Does cyclothymia affect concentration?

Poor concentration is a symptom of depression.  Inability to focus on a task or subject for an extended amount of time is a symptom of mania and hypomania. So in summary? Yes.

Anecdotally, my concentration levels are one of the key ways I monitor my moods.  The moment my concentration drops significantly, I know I’m heading up or down.  We’re talking about something more significant than a tendency to procrastination, or that fidgety Friday feeling we all get; we’re talking staring at a page and reading the same sentence 6 times but taking nothing in. We’re talking abandoning one task to begin another because a better idea just occurred to you.  Lack of concentration, when it’s symptomatic of cyclothymia, describes just not being able to discipline or motivate yourself into acting in any other way than you are; it can mean doing a job is like wading through treacle so hard it is to make your mind process anything, or feeling like a butterfly on speed, flitting from one idea or job to the next without a pause in between, but completing nothing.

What are the habits or behaviours typical to cyclothymia?

I’ve written in various entries about some of the common experiences of cyclothymia, from hypomania, to anxious compulsions, to the suddenness of the onset of mood swings which is characteristic of cyclothymia.  I tag entries dealing with my experiences of specific symptoms of cyclothymia with ‘symptoms and habits’

To a degree, manifestations of cyclothymia are as unique as the sufferers, in other ways, there are a distinct list of symptoms which we all experience to a greater or lesser degree – some of which are also common to other mental health disorders.

Is my psychiatrist right about cyclothymia?

Short answer; yes.  Long answer; no.

Psychiatrists have a habit of telling people with cyclothymia that without treatment it will develop into bipolar II but this seems to be anecdotal and difficult to disentangle from people being re-diagnosed with Bipolar II after not responding to treatment for cyclothymia.  Psychiatrists, in my experience, also have a habit of insisting your life will be dramatically altered because of cyclothymia, and that you cannot successfully manage it alone – this may not be true, or it may.  There are so may variables in anybody’s life which make such pronouncements utterly meaningless.

Seek advice and information on cyclothymia from your GP, psychiatrist, from Mental Health charities or advisers, and speak to other sufferers.  Do not allow yourself to be pressured into decisions or treatments you feel uncomfortable with and feel empowered to ask for second opinions.  Psychiatrists do not have all the answers, they are not sooth sayers, they do not have a crystal ball.

I wrote a little on my experiences of following, and not following, a psychiatrists advice in my post ‘things I want you to know if you have cyclothymia

Can you manage cyclothymia without medication?

Perhaps.  I can.  Or rather I am trying.  Its a continual process and it depends heavily on your lifestyle, your job, your experiences of medication and your ability to maintain healthy routines.

I have written here, and here, about my attempts to manage cyclothymia without medication.  After a few years, it’s still currently the right choice for me; it may not always be the right choice for me and it may never be the right choice for you, but it is possible.

What medication can be used to manage cyclothymia?

I have taken a slew of anti-depressants and the last medications I was on were Seroquel and Mirtazipine which worked to an extent but ultimately I decided the benefits were outweighed by the side effects.

Wikipedia has a very brief list of the medications commonly used to treat cyclothymia as does the NHS choices website (scroll down for ‘How is it treated?’) For detailed information on a drug you have been prescribed I recommend asking your doctor or psychiatrist, and having a look on the Crazy Meds site which I have always found to be both frank and accurate.

How do you live with cyclothymia?

This is the question my entire blog is aimed at exploring.  There isn’t, I am confident, a single answer.  I’m finding careful use of some medications (anti anxiety and sleeping tablets), occasional short courses of talking therapy, healthy physical routines and habits, and being tolerant of my own fluctuating reserves of energy and resolve, all contribute to me feeling in control of my life with cyclothymia.

It’s not an easy road, but it is one that it is possible to walk, with time, and effort put into finding what does and doesn’t work for you – either alone or in conjunction with mental health professionals, and supportive friends and family.

And finally, a google search term I couldn’t turn into a question;

Cyclothymia and stupid people

Unfortunately, cyclothymia does not bestow you with the super power to avoid stupid people, or eradicate them from your life. Sorry.

Have you still got a question that needs answering? Do you want to add to or query any of these answers? Please drop me a line in the comments.

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Filed under cyclothymia 101, diagnosis, medication, self-hood and cyclothymia, symptoms and habits

As in thesis, so in life….or something.

This blog has been rather neglected the last couple of months; not for lack of ideas, plenty of topics have flashed through my mind but somehow, I haven’t managed to put fingers to keyboard.

I’ve spent much of the last two months being blocked on writing a particular section of my thesis.  Last week I decided to put that section aside and begin revising another section.  Suddenly words flowed again and I began to believe it would be possible to physically turn out enough words, if not sufficient quality of words, to complete my PhD in the next 12 months.  As in thesis so, it seems, in life; I decided to delete my facebook and twitter accounts this weekend (temporarily, most likely) and found I had more hours in my day and lo! The flat is clean, my admin for my job is up to date, and I’m sticking to my daily writing goals.  Which brings us to the blog; I find I have time to think and write and construct a blog post.

I’ve actually had a steady period of mood for about a month now and kept noticing it, and silently celebrating, before returning to whatever I was doing when the thought occurred to me.

These last few weeks I’ve been getting angrier and angrier.  Tiny things began aggravating me, I snapped at everyone for everything they said. I watched myself doing this, watched myself getting angry but didn’t feel I had any power to stop myself – my mouth was running ahead of my head.  I expected this to turn into a depressive period, somehow, it hasn’t.

The last few days I’ve had terrible nights’ sleep, punctuating by frequent waking, feverish vivid dreams, and exhaustion come the morning.  I’m full of ideas but unable to settle on any one activity for more than 45 minutes. I’m still angry.  But I’m also periodically floored by acute moments, minutes, hours, of profound despair.  I think everyone hates me and am convinced everyone is talking about me behind my back/the moment I leave the room. The brain gremlins are chatting to me, recounting every stupid decision I’ve ever made and social faux pas, real or imagined, and assuring me I’m an ass.

It feels like I’ve been emotionally blocked in the same way I was blocked with my thesis writing and now I’m able to write everything I need to – blog, thesis, teaching feedback, teaching coursework – I’m also able to experience all my usual range of emotions, except, much like the writing, they are happening all at once.  Angry, sad, inspired, social, paranoid, exhilarated, manic, disjointed.

It’s a lot. It’s not bad…but it’s not good either. It’s just sort of…everything.

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Filed under symptoms and habits